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Risk Factors of Chronic Kidney Disease

Are you at risk for kidney disease?

Answer 12 simple questions to learn about your risk for kidney disease.

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Learn what can put you at risk for chronic kidney disease

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 10% of adults in the US have chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, many Americans are not aware that they may have it. It is important to learn about the many risk factors to find out if you may be at risk. Being informed can help you make the kind of choices that can keep your kidneys working—longer.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health say you may be at risk if you have the following family history or personal background:

  • Members of your family have kidney disease.
  • You were born prematurely.
  • You are African American, Hispanic, or American Indian (there are higher rates of diabetes and high blood pressure in these communities).
  • You are older (chronic kidney disease increases after age 50 and is most common among adults over 70 years old).

Did you know that men who have been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease are 50% more likely than women to have kidney failure?1

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health state that you may be at risk if you have the following health issues:

  • You have uncontrolled high blood pressure.
  • You have diabetes (type 1 or type 2).
  • You have blockages in your kidneys or ureters.
  • You have high cholesterol.
  • You are obese.
  • You have lupus.

You may be adding to your risk if you have the following lifestyle behaviors or habits:

  • Overuse of over-the-counter pain pills that contain ibuprofen, naproxen, or acetaminophen.
  • Use of or addiction to street drugs.
  • Allergies to prescription drugs.

Here are some tips that may help you keep your kidneys functioning longer:

High blood pressure or diabetes.
Reduce your risk of chronic kidney disease by learning how to manage these diseases. Learn more about high blood pressure and diabetes.

Blockages in your kidneys or ureters.
There are treatments available for these conditions. Talk to your doctor about treatment.

Overuse of over-the-counter pain pills such as ibuprofen or naproxen (known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs), or acetaminophen
Discuss alternative approaches with your doctor, to address your need for pain pills each day or each week.

Use or addiction to street drugs.
Get help to stop taking street drugs.  Being honest with your doctor may provide the help you need to stop using, and may help you avoid damage to your kidneys

Allergies to prescription drugs.
Keep track of any known drug allergies, and promptly tell your doctor about any symptoms you have after you start a new drug.

If you have any of these risk factors, talk to your doctor about getting tested for chronic kidney disease.

Know your GFR flow

GFR (glomerular filtration rate) is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. It helps your doctor diagnose kidney disease by determining how well your kidneys are cleaning your blood.

Learn about diagnosis

Learn about chronic kidney disease

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, learn as much as you can—as soon as you can. Find out how to keep your kidneys functioning longer. Learn about the stages of chronic kidney disease and plan ahead by understanding the treatment options available for kidney failure.

Download a Helpful Brochure

Brochures

Get important information and helpful tips about living with chronic kidney disease.

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Connect with a Healthcare Professional

Attend a Fresenius Medical Care Treatment Options Program (TOPs) in your area to discover resources, information, and support available to you and your family.

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